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Google is changing the way it creates headlines for results

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Google has confirmed that the Google Search engine has changed the way it creates headlines for search results listings.

Prior to that, the titles may change depending on the request issued. In general, this will no longer happen with our new system.

This is because we believe our new system produces titles that work better for documents as a whole, to describe what it is, whatever the particular query.

The new system generation Google shares webpage has been well documented since it was discovered in the results of search live last week.

As SEO industry players have observed, Google is actually replacing web page titles with other text on the page:

Additionally, although we have gone beyond HTML text to create titles for over a decade, our new system uses that text even more.

In particular, we use text that humans can visually see when they land on a web page. We consider the main visual title or title displayed on a page, content that site owners often place in & lt; H1 & gt; tags, in other header tags (Hn,), or that is rendered tall and prominent through the use of styling treatments.

When replacing web page titles, other texts contained in the page may be taken into account.

Previously, Google often used the query that the searcher entered into the search box when formulating the title of search results snippets. But now Google has said that “generally” Google will “no longer use” the query when creating these titles. Instead, Google has a new system for generating these headlines that the company says “describe what it is, whatever the particular query.” “

Google may also consider using text in links pointing to pages. Why is Google doing this? Danny Sullivan goes on to explain.

Why this change of Google in the results

Google may consider using alternate text in cases where the HTML title tag on a page does not properly describe what it is.

Danny Sullivan says title tags don’t always describe a page well because they can be either:

  • Too long
  • Stuffed with keywords
  • Without any text or reusable text

Overall, our update is designed to produce more readable and accessible titles for the pages. In some cases, we may add site names when deemed useful.

In other cases, when we come across an extremely long title, we may select the most relevant part rather than starting at the beginning and truncating more useful parts.

The fact that Google takes a different approach to generating web page titles does not make title tag optimization any less important. Sullivan says so while sharing his advice following the update.

… Our main advice on this page for site owners remains the same. Focus on creating great HTML title tags (title tags).

If you are wondering if it is still worth creating unique titles for your pages, the answer is 100% YES.

Don’t leave that to Google. Sullivan says the original HTML title tags will still be used over 80% of the time.

Of all the ways we generate titles, HTML title tag content is still by far the most likely used, over 80% of the time.

In testing, Google says this update produces titles that are easier to read and more searcher-friendly than the old way of generating titles.

Google wrote that the search company is “already making improvements” to the new “comment-based” title system , and Google promises to “keep working to make it even better over time . 

Google has heard the comments and is collecting examples of where these headlines don’t make sense. In fact, Danny Sullivan even said it could lead to more controls in Google Search Console to allow us to better manage our titles in Google search results .

Can I decline this update?

Websites cannot refuse to have their page titles replaced by Google.

Danny Sullivan said several days ago that he would like SEOs to have at least one option when it comes to preserving page titles .

It suggests a feature in Search Console where you could tell Google not to override the title tag on specific pages.

There is no word on whether such a feature is being considered within Google at this time.

So if you’ve noticed any changes in your click-through rate from Google search results , it may be related to those changes

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